Smaller than the Smallest


Tonite I made a teeny tiny batch of Muscadine Grape Jelly. For those of you not familiar with the muscadine grape, it is about the size of a small plum and grows abundantly in the Southeast United States. Muscadines are sweet with a slightly earthy taste, which some people say makes them taste more like wine straight off the vine than other grapes. This reporter can offer no comment on that since the last time she had wine was at Friday night Sabbath: Manischevitz in a dixie cup.

I only had a small amount of muscadines, but went for it anyway because I just need to be making jam. And super small batches (in this case I yielded only 4 jars) are fine now that I don’t rely solely on online sales. I can sell the jars at my table on Sundays.

Some people are jelly adverse. I’m not. Actually, I am feeling separation from my ornamental crabapples in Pennsylvania. They made the best jelly–full of tartness and deep red in color. The heirloom crabapple tree at the Gita Nagari farm was also a great jelly maker–rosey brownish in color–completely traditional.

The color of this Muscadine Jelly is more red than purple. Honestly speaking, I think it tastes closer to mulberry than concord grape. It’s so fun to make these tiny little jams out of unusual fruit. I know that the blog readers get excited about these little expansions of our gastronomical world. So if you are eager to taste a new kind of grape, shoot me an email at sabjimata@gmail.com. If I make some more, I will list it in the Sabjimata Store. Muscadine Jelly is only $6.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Smaller than the Smallest

  1. Padi

    Save me one for Sunday…I’m going to have to do a trade though, is that ok?

  2. Devadeva Mirel

    interesting. what are you going to give me? more muscadines???

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